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All About Citations

Identifying Citations

A citation may be in-text or at the end of a document under "Works Cited", "References", or "Bibliography".  While doing your own research, you may want to give items you find cited a closer look.  Here are tips for recognizing common types of sources cited and how to access them.


Books

Book citations include the place and location of publication. Check Thorncat, our online catalog, to determine if we have the book.  If not, we can borrow it for you via interlibrary loan.

Example

Borden, Richard J.  Ecology and Experience: Reflections from a Human Ecological Perspective. Berkeley, CA.: North Atlantic Books, 2014.


Chapters in a Book

Citations for book chapters will include the word "In".  To view the chapter, find the book.  First look in Thorncat, our online catalog, for the book title (Serpentine: The Evolution and Ecology of a Model System).  If it isn't there, we can borrow it for you via interlibrary loan.

Example:

O'Dell, R. E. & Rajakaruna, N. (2011). Intraspecific Variation, Adaptation, and Evolution in S. Harrison & N. Rajakaruna (Eds.),  In Serpentine: The Evolution and Ecology of a Model System (pp. 97-137). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.


Articles in a Journal.

Journal articles will include the journal volume and number. To determine if we have the journal identified below (Art History) and the correct volume and number, search our library journals.  If we do not have it, you can submit your request to interlibrary loan, and we will get it for you!

Example:

Clinger, C. (2010). Theory of the Ridiculous: Jean Paul, Max Beckmann and Dostoevsky's Donkey, Art History. 33(3), 512-533